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As we head towards World Polio Day on October 24th let's take a look at the latest information from Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

The video below gives us a look at why we need to eradicated this disease NOW!

THIS WEEK

Polio this week as of 11 September 2018

  • Summary of new viruses this week: Afghanistan – One new case of wild poliovirus (WPV1). Pakistan – One new case of wild poliovirus (WPV1). Papua New Guinea – three new cases of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 1 (cVDPV1). Somalia – two new cases of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2). Afghanistan and Pakistan continue to detect WPV1 through environmental sampling, indicating sustained transmission. See country sections below for more details.
  • The Johns Hopkins University is leading a project to document lessons learned from GPEI, and translating those lessons to improve delivery of other lifesaving health programmes and strengthening health systems globally. Read more and learn how you can contribute: GPEI Lessons Learned Project.
  • Featured on www.polioeradication.org: Coffee with Polio Experts – Anand Balachandran of WHO talks about how to ensure that the infrastructure built up to eradicate polio will continue to benefit broader public health goals, long after the disease has been eradicated.

Welcome to the Rotary Peace Academy

In this free training course, discover the strategies and tools that can help individuals, Rotarians like yourselves, cities and nations to build and sustain peace, through the internationally recognized and transformational eight-pillar Positive Peace framework. Through this academy, you will strengthen your knowledge and identify concrete ways to enhance and engage in Rotary’s work in peace and conflict resolution and the Areas of Focus – all via a Positive Peace lens.

 

How to Spread Positive Peace

 

When I learned about the Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP), a think tank dedicated to using empirical research to better understand the drivers of peace, as a Rotary Peace Fellow in 2016, I was fascinated. The idea that peace – which often lives in a lofty realm of aspiration and emotions – could be articulated in concrete metrics, underpinned by data, and visualized through heat maps and charts was new and profoundly impactful to me.

I hadn’t yet known that the following year, Rotary and IEP would embark on a strategic partnership. As I see it, this partnership represents a critical bridge between research and action, as it will equip Rotarians working on the ground with concrete tools and frameworks to promote “Positive Peace.” Defined as the attitudes, institutions, and structures that correlate to the world’s most peaceful societies (a framework IEP has developed through statistical analysis), Positive Peace is a natural foundation for this collaboration.

There are several ways you can get involved in our partnership. I invite you to check out the newly launched Rotary Peace Academy, which is an online learning platform for Rotarians. Within a few hours, you can familiarize yourself with IEP’s research frameworks and methodology, through the lens of Rotary’s mission and areas of focus. The Academy provides examples of practical and creative applications of Positive Peace to help you incorporate this framework into your own service projects.

If working with your community to find new ways to build and promote peace sounds like fun, your club or district can host a Positive Peace Workshop. IEP and Rotary have held workshops for hundreds of Rotaractors and youth in Uganda and Mexico (respectively), and we’re planning workshops in Mexico and Colombia for early 2019. The workshops establish Positive Peace as a neutral framework that can be adapted to unique cultural and regional contexts. A guide for Rotarians on how you can host your own workshop will be available in the coming months.

We’re counting on Rotarian peacebuilders to tell us what you think of Positive Peace, and how the partnership can better serve your work. For further resources and to be involved in this partnership, please contact Summer.Lewis@rotary.org

Laurie Smolenski is the outreach and development officer at the Institute for Economics and Peace. She is also a 2016 Rotary Peace Fellow.

These brothers launched a line of clothing to continue research Stargardt's Disease, a progressive vision loss found in children and teenagers.  Similar to macualr degeneration in older adults Stargardt's causes central vision loss.  
 
Current research projects are in trial phase and 100% of the money raised by the Blind Brothers line of clothing goes to research.
Get Your Service On
 
This morning Frank Quinn, our President, issues a Service Challenge to the Glenville and Niskayuna Rotary Clubs. 
Based on our goal and mission of Direct Community Service rather than meetings and fundraising, the challenge is about performing acts of service and kindness .
 
If you read Frank's article 1440 in our Bulletin, you are already thinking along the lines of the daily things you do or can do  in your local and global communities.  
 
From Frank's article - "Each day has 1440 minutes (60 min * 24 hrs). One minute equals 0.069% of a day or about 60 heart beats. I think it would be wonderful if each member of our eClub invested at least 1 minute each day in service, committing random acts of kindness, or creating a better world in some other way."
 
When I read the 1440, I thought "what a strong sense of community and engagement this gives me."  We are all members of some type of community but how often does the value and benefit  of that connection cross your mind?  
 
Investing one minute of each day in service and acts of kindness, leads to more minutes and multiplying that by the 1.2 million Rotarians in the world and it's easy to see the impact each of us makes.   
 
Perhaps  you read about EClub member, Jaimen McMillan's Cirque Eze summer program for middle school students using circus skills to teach life skills.  A fine example of a large scale project touching the lives of children and adults.
 
Or perhaps you read about Pepi Noble's one person literacy outreach through her Little Free Library and Reading Friday's programs.  An example of a small activity that impacts her community.  300 minutes a week does make a difference!
 
Tell us more about what you are doing or the kindness you showed someone today.  
 
Note from Frank - are you available today for just 1 minute ?
Literacy - A Community Affair
 
Literacy and Community go hand-in-hand.  You've heard that before.  Sounds good but have you ever asked yourself WHY?  Recently I found this statement in an article from projectliteracy.org:
 
"From a collective perspective, a literate community is a dynamic community; a community that exchanges ideas, engages in dialogue is more innovative and productive. The sharing of ideas, perspectives and concerns also leads to greater levels of mutual understanding and caring, and ultimately strong community spirit"
 
Communities do many things to bring about idea exchange, increase dialogue and increase understanding - newspapers, local magazines, block parties, even garage sales.  
 
My own community does them all.  We even have a local online exchange.  We also have a dynamic public library with classes and meetings and lots and lots of books.
 
Adding a Little Free LIbrary seemed like a natural way to extend a love of reading and contribute to our caring community.  Book exchanges are a nice way to meet your neighbors, do good without spending lots of money and with over 70,000 around the world, can be done in YOUR community too.
 
My LFL # 17197 is located on my property just off the driveway - easy for cars to pull up and safe for the biking and walking traffic.  I used an old newspaper vending machine (with the coin exchange removed) as the first library.  Soon I realized I need room for more books so I found a large container meant as a small tool shed as my current library.  I had it insulated and leveled.
 
 
The message Take A Book Leave A Book helps keep the Library fresh and new.  I am also the 'go-to' person for donations from friends and neighbors.
 
The Library gets involved in other things too.  On Earth Day I give away seed packets; at Thanksgiving you can find holiday food items and at Christmas I leave small toys.
 
Currently I am giving away Dictionaries for Back To School.  And I started a summer reading program called Reading Friday.  Every Friday you will find me out at the library with a good book in hand and read for an hour.  I do this to get the word out about the library but also to get to meet my neighbors.  It's lovely to sit and read.
 
There are lots of ways to create a library even if you don't have any property.  You can use a suitcase, a knapsack or similar, put in some books and stop in to a cafe for coffee or go to a meeting.  If you sign up with http://littlefreelibrary.org you will get your own LFL number and sign.  Check out their website for many many ideas.
 
Two next steps for me: first I'm redesigning my current library - stay tuned for what it will look like very soon.  Secondly I invested in a collapsible mobile library so I have a better way to carry books around to my local assisted living faciluty and to doctor's appointments (you know how we all sit around stuck with those old magazines - now people will have the opportunity to take a book to while away the time.)
 
Literacy and Community - a very good thing.  You can do it too.  And did I mention that it's FUN!
 
 
 
How EClub Members Serve Our Communities 
 
Each summer, Jaimen and Spacial Dynamics holds this unique program Cirque - Eze for middle school youth..  Read more about it at https://www.spacialdynamics.com/cirqu-eze/E
 
This amazing group of circus youth fell in love with, well, falling!
This play-ground for 11 to 16-year-olds taught life-long lessons on the grace of gravity and the laughter of levity!
Juggling Balls, Scarves, Diabolos, Stilts, Tight Wires, Climbing Fabric, Spinning plates, and Unicycles! Group Skits, Mime, and Camp-Fires forged friendships of s life-time!
 
 
 
Our mission is to provide hope to children with heart disease from developing countries, regardless of their gender, creed, or national origin, by supporting autonomous Gift of Life programs in an effort to care for these children in need and to coordinate the development of sustainable pediatric cardiac surgery, catheterization and aftercare programs in select countries through the empowerment of local healthcare professionals.
 

Rotary Support

Gift of Life is a Rotarian-based nonprofit organization which consists of 80 autonomous Gift of Life programs in 79 countries across five continents.

Thanks to the participation of 241 Rotary Clubs and 52 Rotary Districts around the world, Rotary Global Grants have become a major funding source for Gift of Life International and its affiliated programs. Through this partnership with Rotary, we are able to maximize our impact in providing care to children in need. Since 2013, more than $7.1 million in Rotary Grants have helped to heal little hearts around the world.

It's Youth Services month and this story about Rotaract demonstrates the work of this organization of younger Rotarians.  This high energy club in Argentina worked together to make a difference in people's lives.  Their experiences, told in the story below, 
This is a story about friendship, possibilities, imagination and how collaboration might change the world.  It's a story where the disabled and abled community comes together. 
 
After you watch the video, please click on this link http://wecarrykevan.com/ to read about the rest of the story.  
Hen Power
 
A thought-provoking look at a therapy designed to help alleviate loneliness and depression.    This idea has spread throughout England and Wales and all the way to Australia.  
 
What do you think?  Comment on our June Wall please.
 
When I first saw these photos and read how the children of this Tibetan Children's Village school in India gathered to welcome visitors I realized that children everywhere and yes, perhaps schools most places welcome visitors in similar ways - flags, gifts, happy faces, lots of pictures, assemblies.  
 
So among our differences we can celebrate similarities as well.  Thanks to EClub member, Phuntsok Namygal, Data Administrator of the school, for these lovely photos and our story of the week.
 
STORY
TCV Welcomes US Congressional representative Lleana Rose Lehtinen and Rep. Claudia Tenney along with her team today in the afternoon. We are very happy to have them in the midst of our very innocent and loving children welcoming them with flags held high as they possibly can reach.
A Note from Pep - This letter from our District Governor resonated with me because I also believe that Rotary is something you must experience, an emotional connection.  For me it was a little 3rd grade girl who kissed the dictionary I gave her.  That was my Rotary 'aha'  moment.  I carry that picture in my heart.
 
For others it's the drop of polio vaccine or seeing a family take their first drink of clean water or watching a child put on a new warm winter coat.  For others it's traveling to assist communities to build computer labs, or pioneering conservation projects and community development and for others it's moving us towards peace.
 
Having just inducted two new members into our Rotary family I also feel responsible for helping them find the Truth of Rotary to enrich their lives.
 
Have YOU had an 'aha' Rotary moment?  Please share it on our November wall.
 
Welcome to our Rotarian Visitors from Around the World!
 
You are in good company!  As an EClub we make it very easy to make up missed meetings. Each week there is a new e-Bulletin that serves as our meeting forum. There are also many archived bulletins. You can select any of these marked Weekly Meeting Activities on the right Menu bar as a Make-Up.  
 
After spending roughly 30 minutes on the website, please fill out this form and send to our secretary Camilla Lake. She will forward the necessary documentation to your club secretary to credit attendance.
 
Have you checked out our Flag Counter at the bottom of this page?  Stop in and let us know where you are from.
 
We are striving to be convenient and accessible while still living up to the highest ideals of Rotary. Please visit again soon!
 
 
 
 
 
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